Tag Archives: Windows Phone SDK

EvenTiles from Start to Finish–Part 6

In the previous episode of this series about how to develop a Windows Phone application from scratch we used IsolatedStorage to persist some data. Since IsolatedStorage is a file store on a Windows Phone device, for exclusive use by a single application, it can be a challenge to look at its contents. Luckily, the Windows Phone 7.1 SDK has a tool available to explore IsolatedStorage contents. In this episode of EvenTiles we will explore this Isolated Storage Explorer Tool.

The Isolated Storage Explorer Tool is a command line tool, which is installed together with the Windows Phone 7.1 SDK in the following folder:

C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Windows Phone\v7.1\Tools (64 bit OS)
or
C:\Program Files\Microsoft SDKs\Windows Phone\v7.1\Tools (32 bit OS)

The tool itself has a lot of parameters, to get contents from IsolatedStorage, to write contents to IsolatedStorage, to specify an application and to specify a device. In a command prompt some limited help information is available:

image

In order to retrieve our ApplicationSettings from IsolatedStorage for EvenTiles, the first thing we need to know is the ProductID for our application. This ide can be found in the WMAppManifest.xml file.

WMAppManifest.xml
  1. <Deployment xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/windowsphone/2009/deployment" AppPlatformVersion="7.1">
  2.   <App xmlns="" ProductID="{883385e6-52e5-4835-83db-8a17499b5767}" Title="EvenTiles"

The next thing we need to do is make sure that the Emulator is started (or a physical device is connected). Either should have the application installed, but it is not necessary to have the application running. After passing the following command,

image

the folder C:\iso will contain a snapshot of our application’s IsolatedStorage.

image

When we drag and drop the _ApplicationSettings file to Visual Studio 2010, you can see that its contents are XML data, representing a Dictionary with one single entry defined in it, matching our Secondary Tile’s back side string.

image

You might not like using a command line tool to explorer IsolatedStorage. In that case, there is good news for you. If you browse to http://wptools.codeplex.com/, you will find the Windows Phone Power Tools for download. This handy collection of tools embeds the different SDK tools including the Isolated Storage Explorer Tool inside a Windows application. With that application you can explore your application’s IsolatedStorage as well. Using the power tool, it is also easy to write new or modified files to your application’s IsolatedStorage. The latter makes a lot of sense if you want to test new versions of applications against old contents in IsolatedStorage, for instance to migrate old files to new versions.

image

The following video shows the Isolated Storage Explorer Tool and the Windows Phone Power Tools in action.

Using the Isolated Storage Explorer Tool and the Windows Phone Power Tools

So this time we did not add functionality to our EvenTiles application, but it is important to learn about useful tools to help us develop our applications as well. In the next episode we will talk about Tombstoning and Fast Application switching and what we need to do in our application to support these two important execution states on Windows Phone devices.

imageIf you want to see EvenTiles already in action on your Windows Phone, you can install the latest release from Marketplace. Remember that this application is not meant to be extremely useful, although it contains similar functionality that “serious” applications have. All functionality that you can find in the released version of EvenTiles will be covered in the upcoming episodes of this blog series, together with all source code. Just go ahead and get your free copy of EvenTiles from Marketplace at this location: http://www.windowsphone.com/en-US/search?q=EvenTiles (or search on your phone for EvenTiles in the Marketplace application).

EvenTiles from Start to Finish–Part 2

In the first part of this series about how to develop a Windows Phone application from scratch we looked at the initial project and how to initialize the Application Tile by setting elements in the manifest file. Today we will add an ApplicationBar to our application and we will add page navigation as well. We simply take off where we finished in Part 1. Adding an application bar is actually easier from within Expression Blend. This tool can be used to design and prototype Windows Phone applications. The advantages of using Expression Blend to add the application bar are:

  • immediate visual feedback;
  • simple selection / insertion of application bar icons
  • simple reordering possibilities for application bar icons en menu items.

imageVisual Studio can work closely together with Expression Blend. Changes in one environment will be visible in the other environment (usually changed files must only be saved or a project must be rebuilt in order to achieve this). If a solution is already open in Visual Studio, you can start Expression Blend from within the Project Menu as shown. Even though you can use Expression Blend to add code to your Windows Phone pages, you probably want to limit doing so, since you don’t have Intellisense available, which is one of the great features of Visual Studio that really makes entering code easy. You can immediately see that you are in a different environment when looking at Expression Blend. Its default theme color is dark. Something else that is immediately noticeable is the large amount of windows, options and choices available inside Expression Blend. It surely will take you some time to feel comfortable in this powerful design tool.

image

What you can see here is Expression Blend showing the MainPage of our EvenTiles application. You can also see how to select an ApplicationBarIcon in the collection of ApplicationBarIcon buttons. Besides concentrating on creating a (static) UI for a Windows Phone application, Expression Blend is also a fantastic tool to create different visual states and animations. We are still in the early stages of application development in this series, but more in depth usage of Expression Blend will definitely follow later on. For now we will just add a little bit of functionality to our application. Using Expression Blend, two new pages have been added to the project, a Settings Page and an About Page. Both these pages only contain a filled title section. Right now, the only functionality that will be added to the application is code to navigate to each of the two empty pages when the corresponding ApplicationBar buttons are clicked. The following code snippet shows the ApplicationBar that was created with Expression Blend in XAML, and already includes Click event handlers:

ApplicationBar on MainPage
  1. <phone:PhoneApplicationPage.ApplicationBar>
  2.     <shell:ApplicationBar Opacity="0">
  3.         <shell:ApplicationBarIconButton IconUri="/icons/appbar.feature.settings.rest.png"
  4.                                         IsEnabled="True"
  5.                                         Text="settings"
  6.                                         Click="Settings_Click" />
  7.         <shell:ApplicationBarIconButton IconUri="/icons/appbar.questionmark.rest.png"
  8.                                         IsEnabled="True"
  9.                                         Text="about"
  10.                                         Click="About_Click" />
  11.     </shell:ApplicationBar>
  12. </phone:PhoneApplicationPage.ApplicationBar>

To add code to the Click event handers, we are using the C# code behind file, belonging to the MainPage.

image

To create entries in the code behind file for both Click event handlers (and in that way connecting XAML to code), you can right click on the event handler in XAML and selecting Navigate to Event Handler entry from the shown popup menu. The code in the event handlers is very simple, using the NavigationService to navigate to another page by providing a Uri that contains the page name.

Navigating to other pages
  1. private void Settings_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
  2. {
  3.     NavigationService.Navigate(new Uri("/SettingsPage.xaml", UriKind.Relative));
  4. }
  5.  
  6. private void About_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
  7. {
  8.     NavigationService.Navigate(new Uri("/AboutPage.xaml", UriKind.Relative));
  9. }

After deploying the application to the emulator, the Main Page shows an ApplicationBar. Clicking on either of the two ApplicationBar buttons results in navigating to another page inside the application. The following video shows all steps to create the ApplicationBar, the additional pages and the code to navigate from page to page:

Adding an ApplicationBar and showing page navigation

LiveTiles will be extended soon. In the next episode we will take a look at the Silverlight toolkit, Page Transitions and additional controls that are available in the Silverlight toolkit. Make sure to lookout for part three in this series about Windows Phone application development.

Where did my ads go?

Since a few weeks, Windows Phone developers can retrieve data on crash counts and stack traces for each published application through the App Hub. Because two of my applications indeed showed a few crash counts, it was of course time to fix the issues and to update the applications. One of those applications, ClickerLite, uses the AdControl to display advertisements inside the application. Besides fixing bugs, I also built the application against the latest version of the Windows Phone SDK. Instead of having to download and use a separate assembly to enable (Microsoft Advertising pubCenter) ads, the Microsoft Advertising SDK for Windows Phone is now part of the Windows Phone SDK. Of course this makes it easier to use the AdControl with full designer support in both Visual Studio 2010 and in Expression Blend 4.0. However, when I started to test my application, the AdControl was not visible, even though I did set the control up to receive test ads.

ClickerLiteDesignerView

As often, the solution to the problem was easy, although it took me some time to find it. I simply needed to add the ID_CAP_MEDIALIB capability to my application’s manifest file. In the previous version of the Advertising SDK, this capability was not required and therefore not included in the manifest file. The end result was test advertisements showing up in the Visual Studio 2010 designer. However, when running the application (both in the emulator and on a real device), the test advertisements did not show up. This of course was also a clear indication that real advertisements would not show up in a released version of the application.

Adding ID_CAP_MEDIALIB solved the problem, the test ad showed up during testing, and the application was ready to be updated.

On a side note, if you are curious about ClickerLite, you can find it here on the Windows Phone 7 Marketplace. Note: This link will work from a Windows Phone 7, or from a PC with Zune software installed.